6 Tips for Creating a Resume

What defines a good resume has changed over the years; however, the goal of a resume has stayed true—get your foot in the door and bring attention to your name. Here are 6 tips on how you can create a resume that will captivate your future employer and display all you have to offer in a simple yet impactful way.

Tip 1 – Clear & Concise

A good resume is clear, concise (often only one page long) and to the point. List your education, prior work experience, and skill set. Starting your resume in a Word document can make it easy to modify throughout your career. You’ve probably put in some time editing and proofreading your resume, if you haven’t you will want to do so. We’ve found the Big Interview website to be informative when creating your resume— specifically the blog post Creating Really Good Resumes.

Tip 2 – Name

Prominently display your name and contact information at the top of the page. Make sure to align your name on the center of the page so it stands out from the rest of your resume. You will want to give clear direction on how a hiring manager can connect with you to set up an interview after viewing your resume.

Tip 3 – Objective

Your objective may not always be needed. An objective gives you an opportunity to relate what you have to offer your potential employer and how they will benefit by hiring you. A potential employer should be able to find your objective easily below your name and personal information.

Tip 4 – Formatting Information

Formatting your information with bullet points is a good way to maintain an easy-to-read resume. Start with your education, list diplomas or degrees earned. Then provide the experience you have gained at your previous positions. This will give you the opportunity to display your longevity. If longevity is not applicable, be sure to list all of your previous employment to showcase your experience in the workforce. Finally, listing your skills and abilities is one more way to showcase what you have to offer your potential employer.

Tip 5 – Readability

Font style and size can make all the difference in how your resume is perceived. Keeping your font style and size the same throughout the body of your resume will allow for minimal distractions and make it easy to skim through. Even spacing and clean lines is key when choosing a font for your resume. Make sure your font size is readable while allowing the information to fit on one page. To get the employers attentions, your name should be a different font and larger in size.
Looking for tips on what fonts to use in your resume? Check out this article by Cleverism.

Tip 6 – Resources

Use your resources. There is help and advice online for you to use to get your resume in tip top shape. If you are not familiar with Microsoft or formatting a document for a resume, we (Goodwill Omaha) are now offering an Introduction to Microsoft Word course hosted by TriO Programs.  Another helpful website for job tasks, skills, and much more is  O*NET OnLine. 

If you are unemployed or underemployed our Employment Ready and Business Solutions staff are here to assist you.
Follow the links above to learn more about those programs and how they can help you land
your next job.

Stay up-to-date on the latest hiring events and other employment assistance opportunities by following them on Facebook: Employment Ready Powered by Goodwill and Business Solutions by Goodwill.

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Washington County Gives!

Goodwill Omaha is proud to participate in the first Washington County Gives! a 24-hour charitable challenge organized by the Blair Area Chamber of Commerce and Blair Area Community Foundation. The online giving event will take place on November 28 starting at midnight.

All funds raised by Goodwill support our Work Experience program in Blair. Goodwill’s Work Experience program provides students in special education services an opportunity to gain exposure to a work situation in a supportive environment. By participating in Work Experience, students can take the first step in making the transition from a school setting to the world of work.

The Work Experience program at Goodwill’s retail store in Blair allows students with disabilities the opportunity to experience aspects of employment. From following a supervisor’s instructions to staying on task, students are gaining valuable skills to assist in the transition from the classroom to employment.

Earlier this month, the Blair Work Experience staff hosted an Open House to invite student’s families, teachers and community members to see what the students have been learning this semester. Blair Work Experience Trainer, Jenny organized an engaging night for both students and guests that included student-led store tours, face painting and craft tables. Students demonstrated the skills they’ve learned through the Work Experience program and guests enjoyed seeing the students in action.

Your support will allow Goodwill to continue to provide these opportunities for students in Washington County. Help us continue to change lives and strengthen our community by giving to Goodwill’s Work Experience program in Blair during Washington County Gives!

  1. Visit WCNEGives.org on Tuesday November 28, 2017
  2. Click “DONATE NOW”
  3. Select “Goodwill Industries Inc.” to support Goodwill’s Work Experience program in Blair!
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Veterans Day 2017

Goodwill is honored to employ people from diverse backgrounds and varied experiences. Each employee brings a unique perspective and skill set to our agency. Employees who have served in the Armed Forces contribute their strong leadership skills and work ethic every day. At Goodwill we are proud to employ many veterans as they continue to serve their community.

Military servicemen and women are deserving of our respect and honor throughout the year, however Veterans Day reminds us of the sacrifices they and their families have made in service of our country. This special day to remember our veterans marks nearly one hundred years since the end of WWI and the holiday is still widely observed and celebrated.

Veterans Day in the United States is a legal holiday dedicated to American veterans of all wars. In 1918, on the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month, an armistice, or temporary cessation of hostilities, was declared between the Allied nations and Germany in World War I. Commemorated in many countries as Armistice Day the following year, November 11th became a federal holiday in the United States in 1938. In the aftermath of World War II and the Korean War, Armistice Day became legally known as Veterans Day.

Veterans Day is not to be confused with Memorial Day (the fourth Monday in May). Memorial Day honors American service members who died in service to their country or as a result of injuries incurred during battle. While Veterans Day pays tribute to all American veterans – living or dead – but especially gives thanks to living veterans who served their country honorably during war or peacetime.

On November 11, Goodwill stands united in respect for our veterans. Remember to thank current and former service members for the sacrifice they and their families made to keep us all safe.

Below is a list of all Goodwill employees who are veterans.Goodwill employee veterans

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National Disability Employment Awareness Month in October

We were very fortunate to have our Work Experience Coordinator, Samuel Comfort, write this blog that outlines what National Disability Employment Awareness Month (NDEAM) is and the steps we, as a community, can take to be inclusive and aware of our words and actions year-round. 

RECAP OF EVENTS IN OCTOBER

October is recognized as National Disability Employment Awareness Month (NDEAM). NDEAM is a campaign that celebrates the contributions of workers with disabilities and provides education about the value of a diverse workforce inclusive of their skills and talents. Held annually, NDEAM is led by the U.S. Department of Labor’s Office of Disability Employment Policy, but its true spirit lies in the many observances held at the grassroots level across the nation.

Goodwill Industries is proud to support NDEAM by educating our clients, employees and customers about disability employment issues and celebrating the many and varied contributions of America’s workers with disabilities. Throughout the month of October, Goodwill hosted events in support of NDEAM such as Mayoral Proclamations in Council Bluffs and Omaha, weekly sign language classes and social media campaigns to engage the community. Through the use of an interactive calendar, Goodwill provided the community opportunities to learn the importance of issues such as person-first-language, disability etiquette and how #InclusionDrivesInnovation.

On October 2, Council Bluffs Mayor Matt Walsh proclaimed support for NDEAM throughout the Council Bluffs community. Close to 100 people from community agencies and businesses, Goodwill’s Work Experience participants, and the Council Bluffs Chamber of Commerce gathered to celebrate the mayor’s proclamation with a ceremonial ribbon cutting.

On October 19, Goodwill hosted Franklin Thompson, Director of Human Rights and Relations for the City of Omaha, at Benson Park Plaza as he delivered a proclamation signed by Mayor Jean Stothert. Goodwill CEO and President Dr. Mike McGinnis welcomed all in attendance, including Omaha Public Schools, ENCOR, Madonna School, Embassy Suites, SourceAmerica as well as Goodwill staff, YouthBuild and Work Experience Program participants.

Basic sign language classes were offered during October at Benson Park Plaza. These weekly classes were open to the public. Classes provided over 40 Goodwill employees and individuals from the community an opportunity to learn the basics of American Sign Language. Attendees also learned about deaf culture in order to more confidently interact with deaf and hard of hearing individuals in their communities.

Goodwill programs distributed a survey to gauge local employers’ inclusive hiring and employment policies in October. The results of this survey will help shape the future of Goodwill’s efforts as we develop trainings aimed at eliminating unemployment among ALL who want to work, including individuals with disabilities.
National Disability Employment Awareness Month activities are not solely confined to October. Goodwill seeks to promote a disability-friendly work environment year-round. Here are some ways we can carry out the spirit of NDEAM.

 

USE PERSON FIRST LANGUAGE

Using person first language helps avoid perceived and subconscious devaluation when talking to or about a person with a disability. Simply put, person first language emphasizes the PERSON, rather than the disability. Person first language can be applied to any group that is defined by a condition rather than as a people: for example, “those that are homeless” rather than “the homeless.” By using this structure, the speaker articulates the idea of disability as a secondary attribute, not a characteristic of a person’s identity. Disability is only one piece of a whole person.

As our understanding has evolved, so has the use of certain terms. When writing and speaking about people with disabilities, choose words that carry positive, non-judgmental connotations. Avoid words which put the person with a disability into a “victim” category. Consider the use of the word “handicapped.” Like many terms that refer to minorities, there is negativity attached to it. At the least, it denotes a problem or a burden. At worst, it denotes incapability. Strive to highlight what people CAN do, rather than what they cannot.

Click for a list of person first language examples >>>

 

DISABILITY ETIQUETTE 

Striving to place the person first also incorporates disability etiquette. Disability etiquette is something which can teach us to remember the individual traits of a person, not a disability. It is important that we treat all participants, customers and employees in a manner befitting their age, regardless of disability.

Speak directly to a person with a disability, rather than through a companion, aide or sign language interpreter. Don’t be embarrassed if you happen to use accepted, common expressions such as “Good to see you” or “Got to be running along”, that seem to relate to the person’s disability. Making small talk with a person who has a disability is great. Talk to him or her as you would with anyone else.

Respect his or her privacy. If you ask about their disability, he or she may feel like you are treating them as a disability, not as a human being. However, many people with disabilities are comfortable with questions about their disability after getting to know someone. A simple “I don’t feel comfortable sharing that” from the person with a disability can set the tone if it is not something that they are willing to share.

Just because someone has a disability, don’t assume that he or she needs help. Always ask before assisting a person with a disability, “May I help you?” If they need help, they may accept it. If they do not, do not take offense. Never help without asking and if the individual does want help, ask how before you act.

To get the attention of a person who is deaf or hard of hearing, tap the person on the shoulder or wave your hand. Look directly at the person and speak clearly, slowly, and in a normal volume to establish if the person can read your lips. Not all deaf/hard of hearing people can read lips. Those who do will rely on your facial expressions and other body language to help in understanding. Show consideration by keeping your hands away from your mouth when speaking. Shouting will not help the person understand you, but you might ask if pen and paper would help.

When talking to a person in a wheelchair for more than a few minutes, place yourself at the wheelchair user’s eye level to spare both of you a stiff neck. Grab a chair and sit with that person while you talk. Standing over someone in a wheelchair or of short stature causes you both to feel uncomfortable, as well as unnecessary back and neck pain. Avoid touching a person’s wheelchair, scooter or cane. People with disabilities consider their equipment part of their personal space.

When greeting someone with significant loss of vision, always identify yourself and others who may be with you. Say, for example, “On my right is John Miller.” When conversing in a group, remember to say the name of the person to whom you are speaking to give a vocal cue. Speak in a normal tone of voice, indicate when you move from one place to another, and let it be known when the conservation is at an end.

Give whole, unhurried attention when you are talking to a person who has difficulty speaking. Keep your manner encouraging rather than correcting.
Be patient rather than try to speak for the person or fill in the gaps. When necessary, ask short questions that require short answers, or a nod or shake of the head. Never pretend to understand if you are having trouble doing so. Repeat what you understood. The person’s reaction will clue you in on whether you understood correctly. Don’t be afraid to ask them to repeat the parts you did not understand.

Remember, people with disabilities are people first, who just happen to have a disability. Equal treatment is essential to the integration of people with disabilities into the workplace. Thank you to all who contributed to making our October events a success. More importantly, thank you for working to make Goodwill a workplace that ensures all people regardless of ability have access to resources to learn and grow.

Click to learn more about disability etiquette >>>

 

“The best way to help everyone, is for people to learn, understand and respect all people, whether they are the same or different.”
—Steven James Tingus, MS, C.Phil
U.S. Department of Education

“There is no greater disability in society than the inability to see a person as more.”
—Robert Hensel, Poet, Writer, World Record Holder for longest non-stop wheelie in a wheelchair, 6.178 miles.

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Back to School Shopping with the Kids

Goodwill wants to make back to school shopping fun for kids…and parents!

Our Director of Marketing and Development took her children back to school shopping.
Below is her experience at our 180th & Q location!

Back to school shopping is a major process – going from store to store hunting for clothes, shoes, backpacks and school supplies. Not to mention your wallet takes a hit. For the past few years I started planning my back to school shopping a bit differently. Before I shopped at the big box retailers for back to school items, now I make Goodwill my first stop. I start looking for deals on kid’s clothing – because let’s be honest, kids can be quite picky when it comes to finding that perfect outfit for the first day of school. And with kids growing out of their clothes so quickly, it is a challenge to not spend too much by paying full price.

This year we began our back to school shopping at Goodwill on 180th and Q Street. I took my four year old daughter Amelia to look for deals on clothes she can wear to preschool. We found the perfect Justice shirt with a bright pink sparkly A on the front for only $1.59. Now it’s her new favorite shirt! We even had luck finding pants – Old Navy jeans for $2.99 and lounge pants for $1.59.

Of course we couldn’t leave the store without hitting up the toy section.  We walked out with a Disney princess game and a stuffed animal for $1.99 each.

By shopping at Goodwill for back to school clothes, I can feel good about diverting clothes from the landfill as well as saving money for my family.  All while getting really great items that my kids love.

Make Goodwill your first stop for back to school shopping!

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2017 YouthBuild Graduation

On the morning of July 13, 2017, the young men and women of YouthBuild gathered in the hallway at Goodwill Omaha headquarters to begin their walk-through for the graduation ceremony that took place that afternoon. All the graduates and YouthBuild staff had been eagerly waiting for this day. Some of the participants had dropped out of high school multiple times, others came into the program with a mindset that they could do whatever they wanted without consequences. But during their time in YouthBuild, these individuals had learned to overcome those obstacles, and they had developed a new set tools for a successful future.

The entire staff at Goodwill Omaha couldn’t be more proud of what these young individuals have accomplished! Our graduates worked extremely hard over the last ten months to reach their goals.

YouthBuild is a national educational, leadership, development and occupational skill-training program for disadvantaged young adults and is a proud partner of the American Job Center Network. The program serves adults ages 16 to 24 years who have struggled with school and are looking to make a positive change in their life.  YouthBuild combines classroom learning and hands-on construction experience, where students learn basic carpentry skills while giving back to their community through volunteering.

YouthBuild Omaha would like to thank its partners, United Way of the Midlands, ServeNebraska, Habitat for Humanity of Omaha, Abide Network and inCommon, for helping to make this year’s program a success. .

Congratulations YouthBuild Omaha 2017 Graduates! Continue to dream big and accomplish your goals!

 

 

Omaha World Herald article written about the 2017 YouthBuild Graduation

 

 

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Find the Right Program by Knowing Your Interests First

You’ll be asked to consider a lot of things when trying to select the training or education program that will form the foundation of your career—cost, time, requirements, commitments and more are what you should consider when choosing a specific program. But the most basic thing, whether you’re going to be trained for the right career type, can be harder to know.

Some people choose a career path based on what their friends or family say is good; others see something interesting on TV, or they hear about opportunities to earn good money and decide to do that kind of job. Those are all good inputs for choosing a career, but the right career for you is the one you’ll enjoy doing. You don’t need to love your job, but a successful career is usually built on work that you enjoy or in a field that interests you. So how do you know which is the best option? The idea is to look inward at yourself.

Self-Assessment

There is an entire section of GoodProspects dedicated to how you assess your own interests and skills as a way of finding attractive career options (there’s even this assessment just for hospitality careers), but there are great ways to structure that, too, to help you see the best career fit for your interests.

The Career Gateway’s Job Seekers Guide is a great way to look at everything about your skills, interests and values to form an idea of what you could do for your career, and then make a plan to move forward. There are a number of assessments available (you combine them at the end of the process), but this assessment matching interests to occupations is a good place to start; use the .pdf sheet to score yourself, then take the rest of the assessments to build a fuller picture.

Next Steps

After you know where your interests really lie and which career paths they connect to, go ahead and explore career options. Then you’re ready to find the training or education that will get you started. These articles can help you find the right program for you, one that matches what your goals, priorities and professional interests, and these articles can help you get enrolled and on the path to success.

 

Blog shared from Goodwill Industries International
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Be a Community Hero. Shop Goodwill®.

Who’s ready for the new Spider-Man movie? We are! On July 7, Sony Pictures promises thrill, action, and heroism in the form of their new blockbuster Spider-Man: Homecoming. Whether you’re a long-time fan or a little late to the web-slinging wonders of New York City’s most awesome arachnid, here are a few things you can do to get swept up in the excitement!

Comic books

Image via seattlegoodwill.org

First, get acquainted with the magical world of comics. Here’s a quick run-down of comic books through the ages crafted Seattle Goodwill. I love how they’ve broken it up by era and they’ve even listed the most valuable comics of each age! Don’t forget to keep your eyes open for these whenever you head to the thrift store. You could sell your finds to a collector for a huge profit or score a piece of history to start your own collection on a bang! It was in the pages of Marvel Comics’ August 1962 issue of Amazing Fantasy #15 that your friendly neighborhood Spider-Man first came alive, so definitely snag that one if you ever see it.

DIY lamp. Before and after. Supplies from Goodwill.

Image via agirlandagluegun.com

At home, you can add a little excitement with an easy comic lamp revamp like this one  A Girl and a Glue Gun. Grab drab lighting from Goodwill then search the fabric section for Spider-man cloth. Put the two together with a splash of sunny paint and—POW! A statement lamp ready to brighten a kids’ room or comic book nook. Easy projects like this take only a matter of minutes to complete, but are such a perfect way to take your Spider-man fandom to the next level.

Kids doing impression of Peter Parker in disguise. Goodwill NJ

Image via pinterest.com/goodwillnj

Meanwhile, over at Goodwill Industries of Southern New Jersey & Philadelphia spidey-senses are tingling. A couple of cute kiddos posed for this picture shared on Pinterest doing their best impression of Peter Parker in disguise. If you’re in the mood to craft your own costume, swing into action by shopping for your supplies at local Goodwill organizations. Why? Because when you support their mission to help people who are facing challenges to finding employment overcome their hardships and achieve independence through the power of work, that kind of makes you a superhero, too. And, as any true Spider-Man fan knows, with great power comes great responsibility so this is one small thing you can do to help your community.

Blog shared from Goodwill Industries International
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What Kind of Superhero are You?

Last weekend, I was one of many movie-goers who saw the new Wonder Woman (oh, how I wish I had a Lasso of Truth to bring with me to Capitol Hill).  At the same time, my colleagues at Goodwill Industries International are excited about a partnership with Sony in advance of the release of Spider-Man: Homecoming. Superheroes are definitely on the mind.

I recently had the privilege of listening to Andrew Slack, an Ashoka fellow who spoke at a conference about his method of storytelling called “cultural acupuncture”.  Andrew describes this as, “We dream at night, but our culture dreams through books and movies and stories. Working with those stories is cultural dream work. Working with stories that we put energy into is cultural acupuncture….In cultural acupuncture, we find where the psychological energy is in the culture, and move that energy towards creating a healthier body for our world. In cultural acupuncture, stories are the proverbial needles; stories are what resonate. Stories are what can expand our civic imagination and allow us a transformed sense of agency.”

For example, the Hunger Games series has been used to spur conversations about economic inequality, Star Wars opened dialogue around money in politics, and Slack has used Superman and Hamilton to expand the conversations around immigration.  I plan on using Wonder Woman as a starting point to have a conversation about feminism with my nephew.

Most people enjoy the summer blockbusters as a way to escape from the “real world” for a few hours, but I’m challenging myself to go deeper.  How can we embody the superheroes that are needed in our communities? How can we leverage our imaginations to solve the policy issues facing our nation? While I may not be able to stop bullets with my gold bangles or shoot a web from my wrist, I am an informed advocate, I make a difference in my community, and I give voice to people who feel that they have no power.  What kind of superhero are you?

Blog shared from Goodwill Industries International

 

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