Eight Ways to Pitch Your Diverse Background as an Employment Asset

It has become more common to hear employers talk about valuing workplace diversity and inclusion. For Baby Boomers and Gen-Xers, this meant including a certain number of people of different genders or races in the workplace. Today’s Millennial generation, however, prefers “cognitive diversity,” or the blending of different backgrounds, experiences and perspectives within a team.

As employers seek to hire people with diverse racial, sexual, class or religious backgrounds, you can drive the conversation about the value that your own diversity brings to a company.

Use these shifts in values to your advantage when applying and interviewing for jobs. Here are eight benefits of a diverse workplace that you can cite when talking with employers:

  1. Adaptability—Having a workforce of diverse experiences and backgrounds will better prepare organizations to adapt to unforeseen challenges and opportunities.
  2. Range of Service—A diverse workforce can impact the range of services the organization can provide.
  3. Varying Perspectives—Employing professionals from a variety of industries and backgrounds can bring new and different perspectives to the table.
  4. Learning and Growth—Having a diverse staff will create opportunities for people to get to learn more about different backgrounds and professions.
  5. Communication—A staff that can conduct business and provide customer service in multiple languages means opportunities to grow and expand into new markets.
  6. Increased Productivity—An organization with a diverse workforce can often increase productivity by tapping into the wealth of knowledge on staff.
  7. Increased Innovation—Having a wide variety of opinions, skills, experiences and backgrounds on staff is a great way to encourage innovation in the workplace.
  8. Satisfy a Diverse Customer Base—An organization whose staff represents its diverse customer base is a great way to create connections between the staff and the customer.
Blog shared from Goodwill Industries International

Tips for Narrowing Down Your Career Interests

When you first start working, you may try a number of fields and position types to see what works best for you; when it’s time to start a career track, though, it helps to be certain about your goals and what you want to do.

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, it is estimated that the average baby boomer held 11.7 jobs between the ages of 18-48. Millennials are estimated to hold twice that many in a variety of different career fields throughout their natural working lives.

Settling on a path is hard with so much bouncing around. Here are some tips for narrowing down your career interests and seeking out the best opportunities for your long-term career aspirations:

  • Explore Career Tracks: Created by the Office of Career Services at NYU’s Graduate School of Public Service, the career tracks exercise is an excellent tool for identifying career-paths best suited to your individual interests. While the exercise will take some time to complete, it is guaranteed to help you to narrow down viable career opportunities, which is the first step that you should take.
  • Establish Goals: The first and most important step in narrowing down your career interests is to take a moment and identify your personal and professional goals, then determine what you are willing to sacrifice in order to achieve them. Take the time to write down what is most important to you and focus your energy on seeking out opportunities that will satisfy your needs on a holistic level.
  • Find the Right Work Environment: Investigate companies you may be interested in so that you can determine if they will be a good fit for your personality. Web resources like Indeed.com, Glassdoor.com and Salary.com are free to use and provide users with access to information like salaries, incentive programs, reviews of the management staff and just about anything else someone would need to decide if the environment would be good fit. You can also request an exploratory interview or job shadow.
  • Network: Actively seek out relationships with other professionals. Not only can discussing your goals be helpful in identifying viable career opportunities, but it is also helpful to be notified when job prospects become available. While resources like CareerBuilder.com, Monster.com or Job.com can be helpful in your efforts to search for jobs, having a relationship with an internal employee who is willing to refer you for an opening is invaluable. Strive to grow your professional network, find others who share similar career aspirations and brainstorm creative solutions to achieve your goals.

If you are interested in learning more about identifying viable career opportunities, request a virtual career mentor at GoodProspects®, or visit the career discussion forums.

Blog shared from Goodwill Industries International

Six Ways to Look for Work … and How to Use Them

You may not know exactly where to start, but resources, each with their own advantages and disadvantages, are plentiful when it comes to looking for employment.

  • Employment opportunities are a standard feature of all newspapers and are easily accessible and navigated. If you are relocating to a new area, they probably make the most sense, as they will help orient you to the general business climate. Be aware that many newspapers, especially in large cities, have more extensive employment sections on their websites.
  • Many communities have workforce development organizations that assist with employment. Career One Stop centers, Job Corp USA and Goodwill all have the staff and expertise to narrow your search and guide you through the process. All are likely to offer a list of job search engines and calendars of local hiring events.
  • The Internet is also a common way to look for work. Many job search engines exist. Look for sites that use your experience and personality to tailor results and show positions you may be best suited for, such as Indeed.com and www.ApplyApp.ly.
  • Engaging with your social network is still touted as a primary way to find a job. Ask friends, family, former teachers, etc. for information about their employers and knowledge of their industry. If you have a family member or friend who currently works for a company of interest, ask who you would contact for more information. Also consider using online social networks.
  • Cold calling still has a place in the job search process. Identify a company of interest, contact the human resources department and ask if someone could show you around for 10 or 15 minutes so you can gain a better understanding of what they do and why they do it. This is called an “informational interview” and allows you to gather information so you can make a good decision about where you would like to work and are most likely to succeed. Employers often value your initiative and are more likely to offer you an interview when your application is submitted.
  • If you can use a staffing company to find temporary assignments that are targeted to your interests, you may have a great way to learn of job openings. Be aware that some staffing companies assist with permanent placements for a fee, or expect you to refrain from accepting a job with one of their clients for a period of time. It’s best to learn how they operate before using this approach.

Regardless of how you look for jobs, keep an eye out for scams that promise high wages for limited or no investment of time, money or effort—you may spend more money for the job than you could ever hope to make back. The Federal Trade Commission is an excellent resource for researching employment scams.

Looking for employment is a time-consuming activity, so you should make a plan based on your comfort level with technology, desire for assistance, amount of time you are able to devote to job search, and understanding of your work preferences. Decide which resources work best for you, set aside time each day to focus on job search, and be prepared for the unavoidable ups and downs!

Blog shared from Goodwill Industries International

Technical Difficulties – Web Inquiries

It has come to our attention that some recent inquiries from our website contact forms have not been coming through to a staff member to be answered. We are very sorry for this inconvenience and are currently in the works of getting this issue resolved. If you have made an inquiry or submitted a program application and have not heard from us, please contact Elizabeth Donner at [email protected] or 402-341-4609. Thank you and we hope to have this fixed as soon as possible.

Updated: 2/27/17

Spread the Word to End the Word

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Spread the Word to End the Word is an ongoing effort by Special Olympics, Best Buddies and our community supporters, like Goodwill, to inspire respect and acceptance through raising the consciousness of society about the R-word and how hurtful words and disrespect can be toward people with intellectual disabilities.

Using the term retard or retarded belittles people with intellectual disabilities. Spread the Word to End the Word is a day dedicated to educating people about the negative impact the “r” word has. By eliminating the “r” word from our culture, we can build a more inclusive and caring community.

March 1, 2017  all Goodwill locations will participate and advocate for eliminating the “r” word for our vocabulary.

Goodwill Impact 2016

  •  Goodwill’s Work Experience program enrolled 249 special education high school students from local high schools
  • Work Experience students earned a total of $279,820.25 in wages while gaining hands-on experience in a workplace setting
  • Work Experience is housed at nine locations throughout the Metro area
  • Our AbilityOne contract employs 122 individuals, 96 of which who identify as having a disability
  • AbilityOne employees service over 1.2 million square feet of property in federal buildings located in Omaha, Lincoln and
    Grand Island

Respectful and inclusive language is essential to the movement for the dignity and humanity of people with intellectual disabilities. However, much of society does not recognize the hurtful, dehumanizing and exclusive effects of the R-word.

Language affects attitudes. Attitudes impact actions. Make your pledge for #Respect today at www.R-word.org.

 

 

Tips for Writing a Cover Letter

Cover letters are an important part of the job application process. They give the employer a deeper look into what you have to offer and why you would be a good fit for their company. I’m going to share a few tips below on how to make your cover letter stand out.

  • Make it about the company. Every job you apply to should have a personalized cover letter that explains why you want that specific job. This shows the employer that you have taken the time to do your research on this position and this company. Look at the description for the job you’re applying to and match your skills to those they’re looking for.  You can then write about how you have shown those skills in the past.
  • Make it concise. A cover letter should ideally be about three paragraphs long: how you found out about the job, why you want the job, and what skills you have that would benefit the company. It should never be longer than one page.
  • Make it personal. The best way to address a cover letter is to find out who will do the hiring. You can call or email someone in an administrative role at the company to see if they have the contact information for the person who will do the hiring. If you can’t find that information, just write “Dear Hiring Manager” or “Dear Recruiter.” Do not say “To Whom it May Concern.”

Here are some additional sources on crafting good cover letters. When in doubt, contact a GoodProspects virtual career mentor to coach you through the job application process.

Blog shared from Goodwill Industries International

No degree? No problem! Trending Healthcare jobs

The healthcare industry is one of the fastest growing job markets. Omaha’s healthcare market is no exception.  As our country continues to have a growth in the aging population the need for healthcare providers is on the rise. Let Goodwill’s Business Solutions help you Find Your Future at our career fair highlighting the healthcare industry on March 1, 2017.

Here are five trending healthcare jobs that do not require a four-year degree.

  1. LPN (Licensed Practical Nurse)
  • U.S. job listings: 55,202
  • Average salary: $38,776
  • Year-Over-Year Job Growth: 6.56%
  1. Phlebotomist
  • U.S. job listings: 29,736
  • Average salary: $28,623
  • Year-Over-Year Job Growth: 6.10%
  1. Surgical Technician (Operating Room Technician)
  • U.S. job listings: 11,623
  • Average salary: $39,072
  • Year-Over-Year Job Growth: 2.70%
  1. Medical Assistant
  • U.S. job listings: 21,543
  • Average salary: $29,320
  • Year-Over-Year Job Growth: 1.94%
  1. Radiologic Technologist (Radiographer)
  • U.S. job listings: 8,500
  • Average salary: $47,566
  • Year-Over-Year Job Growth: 1.74%
*Data from http://www.simplyhired.com: Simply Hired U.S. Employment Outlook ranks the Best Healthcare Jobs That Don’t Require a 4-Year Degree

Goodwill Business Solutions

WHO WE ARE

Our team of business solutions specialists connect with companies across the metro to learn about their business and hiring needs. We work to match those staffing needs with individuals we serve in the community.

We strive to become experts in your company’s operations and personnel demands.

We foster placements that truly fit those demands. We are also able to provide financial support for the placement, so that employees can prove themselves with a reduced risk to your bottom line.

WHY WE ARE DIFFERENT

We are committed to truly learning about a business before attempting to place individuals. Our business solutions specialists can assist with employment opportunities that benefit the employers and employees alike. And we support these opportunities by providing funds that offset your company’s hiring expenses.

This is a never-before-seen approach to job placement.

NO RED TAPE

No complicated forms. Just Goodwill strengthening your hiring efforts through supported employment.

WE CAN HELP YOU

If you are an employer who is struggling to fill positions, call our Business Solutions team at 402.341.4609 to find out how Goodwill can help meet your business and hiring needs.

Customer Appreciation Days!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We would like to say THANK YOU to all of our customers! Because of loyal customers like you, in 2016 Goodwill has been able to provide over 22,000 employment services to people in our community.

Please join us for a 2-day sale! All customers will receive 10% off, and if you are a Goodwill cardholder, you’ll receive 20% off!

During our sale we will be having popcorn, refreshments and we will be doing merchandise credit drawings, goody bags and coloring pages for children.

And don’t forget to also sign up for our big giveaway!

Two lucky winners from each store will receive 20% off for a whole year!